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Did you know?

Salpeter-Decay- The technique for detecting radiologic decay in tagged molecules called quantitative electron-microscopic autoradiography was developed by Miriam Salpeter during her postdoctoral research in Applied and Engineering Physics in 1961 to 1967.

The theme of research programs in Applied & Engineering Physics is applying the techniques, the training, and the culture of physics to research areas usually associated with other scientific and engineering disciplines. Current research areas of interest to AEP faculty involve combinations of nanoscience, photonics, biological physics, advanced materials, and advanced instrumentation.  AEP research programs involve strong collaborations with faculty members in physics, chemistry, engineering, and the life sciences. AEP has been a leader in integrating the physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering at Cornell for over 60 years.

Students in the graduate program of Applied Physics at Cornell University may pursue thesis research in any one of several broad areas, including:

Research Topics

Astrophysics and Plasma Physics

Astrophysics and Plasma Physics

Pulsed power technology

Atomic, Molecular and Chemical Physics

Atomic, Molecular and Chemical Physics

Plume of La0.6Sr0.4 MnO3

Biophysics

Biophysics

Visualization of transcription activation

Energy

Energy

NIMS for water desalination and filtration

Nanoscience & Nanotechnology

Nanoscience & Nanotechnology

3D imaging of nanostructures

Optical Physics, Quantum Electronics and Photonics

Optical Physics, Quantum Electronics and Photonics

Tunable superluminal propagation