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News Archive for 2002

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Craighead awarded $750,000 by state to further research

December 5, 2002

Cornell engineer and physicist Harold Craighead has been awarded $750,000 by a New York state research agency to develop a chip-based analytical system for rapid analysis of chemical and biological... read more

Richard Lovelace, Professor of Applied and Engineering Physics and a member of the Department of Astronomy, has been elected a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS).

November 21, 2002

The citation on the fellowship certificate, which was presented the week of Nov. 11-15 at the APS Division of Plasma Physics annual meeting in Orlando, Fla., reads: "For pioneering contributions to... read more

Hess and Webb Paper is Cover of October Biophysical Journal

October 1, 2002

Sam Hess and Watt W. Webb's paper, "Focal Volume Optics and Experimental Artifacts in Confocal Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy," was chosen as the cover paper for the prestigious Biophysical... read more

New DNA separation method could bring faster gene sequencing and DNA fingerprinting, Cornell researchers report

September 26, 2002

Cornell University researchers have demonstrated a novel method of separating DNA molecules by length. The technique might eventually be used to create chips or other microscopic devices to automate... read more

Researchers' new DNA separation method could speed gene sequencing

September 23, 2002

Cornell researchers have demonstrated a novel method of separating DNA molecules by length. The technique eventually might be used to create chips or other microscopic devices to automate and speed... read more

What Makes Cornell NanoSmart?

August 1, 2002

The Cornell faculty have proven that they can collaborate effectively in nanoscience and nanotechnology research. The success of several interdisciplinary faculty groups in winning support to carry... read more

Researchers: Disorder forces DNA molecules out of confined spaces

May 9, 2002

A new understanding of how large biological molecules behave in tiny spaces could lead to a method for separating DNA strands by length. It also could throw light on the way molecules move in living... read more

Lois Pollack: Conversion of a 'traditional physicist'

May 9, 2002

When Lois Pollack launched a new course, the Physics of Life, she was aiming at sophomore-level undergraduates. An assistant professor of applied and engineering physics, she was surprised on the... read more

What forces DNA molecules through tight spaces? Not elasticity but disorder, Cornell researchers discover

May 2, 2002

A new understanding of how large biological molecules behave in tiny spaces could lead to a method for separating DNA strands by length. It also could throw light on the way molecules move in living... read more

Four undergrads win Goldwater Scholarships in sciences, engineering

April 11, 2002

The students are sophomores Peter M. Clark of Flemington, N.J., majoring in biology, chemistry and mathematics, and Matthew Moake of Cedaredge, Colo., majoring in biology; and juniors Adam Berman of... read more

Cornell nanotech center shows teachers how to excite students with physics

April 4, 2002

A new Cornell nanotechnology program is helping New York state's high school physics teachers make science come alive for their students. read more

The Biomedical Engineering Puzzle

March 1, 2002

Cutting edge research in fields where engineering and biology meet is nothing new at the College of Engineering. But this academic year marks an initiative to make that research more visible... read more


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